Phobia Robotica

Phobia Robotica is a piece I composed for Phobos-Orquestra Robótica Disfuncional (Phobos – Dysfunctional Robotic Orchestra) that premieres June 3 and 4 at the Serralves em Festa Festival in Porto. This is collaboration with Sonoscopia. Check it out if you happen to be around. Bzzzt!

 

Spotlight of work at Labocine

My recent work with dance  and video featuring some of my favorite collaborators (Nella Turkki, Kirk Woolford, Saguenail, João Menezes, Cristina Ioan, and Laetitia Morais) is presented at Labocine, an online publication from Imagine Science Films. Check it out!

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Photo credit: Kirk Woolford

 

Sharjah debut with saxophonist Emil Sein.

Tonight I will be performing some of my old and recent music at Sharjah’s Flag Island Festival. I will be accompanied by amazing saxophonist Emil Sein. For more info check this link

 

Video from Jinn on Vimeo

Video from Jinn, premiered last March 14, published on Vimeo.

Choreography & Dance: Nella Turkki

Flute & Voice: Cristina Ioan

Video: Saguenail

Motion Capture & Video Compositing: Kirk Woolford

Sound Recording: João Menezes

Music: Carlos Guedes

 

Cool new website!

Check out the Sounds of Sir Bani Yas Island website! This is an ongoing project for recording geo-located sounds on Sir Bani Yas Island, the largest wild animal reserve in the Gulf, founded by HH Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan. This is a work-in progress with the collaboration of Cristobal Martinez, Evgeny Zverev, Imen Haddad, João Menezes, Laura Waltje, Leonid Kuzmenko, Lucas Olscamp, Max Bork, and Yu-Chie (Andrea) Chung (sound recording), Laura Waltje and Leonid Kuzmenko (sound editors), with website design by Mac Davel Kalumbi.

China premiere of “La brume, et la plume du poète qui inquiète”

“La brume, et la plume du poète qui inquiète” for string orchestra will have its China premiere on Saturday, May 28, at the Beijing Modern Music Festival, conducted by Michaël Cousteau. I will give a masterclass at the Beijing Central Conservatory on Friday, May 27.

Jinn

A choreomusical work conceived and performed by Carlos Guedes, Kirk Woolford, Nella Turkki and Cristina Ioan.

  • Choreography & Dance: Nella Turkki
  • Flute: Cristina Ioan
  • Music: Carlos Guedes
  • Video: Saguenail
  • Motion Capture, video compositing & Animation: Kirk Woolford
  • Lighting Design: Simon Fraulo (3/14 and 3/15, 2016) & Elinor Mhairi Burton (4/2 and 4/3, 2016)
  • Sound recording & technical assistance: João Menezes

Premiere: March 14, 2016 at NYUAD Innovation Studio

About Jinn:

The Arabic term jinn means “invisible beings.” The jinn are sentient beings who are composed from subtle matter. Before Islam, they were worshiped as gods, as tutelary deities, or as spiritual protectors not only in the Arabian Peninsula but also in neighboring areas…. In Qu’ran… there is mention that [the jinn] are created from ‘scorching winds’ and ‘a smokeless fire,’ and it is also said that they are like humans in that they are rational beings formed of nations

Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (Ed. Josef Meri, 2006, p.420)

The concept of Jinn in Arab culture is used as a metaphor for addressing the question of the musicality inherent in human bodily movement. Movement sonification in musical ways has been one of my main interests when working with dance. Back in 2003, I developed software that could extract musical rhythms from dance movement in real time and use them has a means to articulate the music during performance. Since then I explored different ways of presenting the relationship between bodily movement in dance and its inherent musicality though the use of software that could help bring that relationship to the fore. 2003 was also the year I started collaborating with Kirk Woolford on developing artistic work that relates to the perception of human bodily motion, in pieces such as Côr ( Guedes, Ula li & Wollford, 2003), Will.0.w1sp (Wollford & Guedes, 2005) or Echo Locations (Wollford & Guedes) 2008).

In this piece, no software is used to establish this relationship. Instead, different perspectives for perceiving the relationship between bodily movement and its inherent musicality are presented in three distinct ways: (1) by performing the sonification of movement in real time with a musical instrument that was created for that purpose; (2) by removing the body from a video in which the sound and the trace left by the movement remain as the witnesses of this relationship; and (3) by presenting a synthetic rendering of the movement performed by the dancer in the form of a graphical particle system that gets synthetically sonified. As the body gets progressively dematerialized, the relationship between movement and its musicality becomes increasingly more apparent and clear.

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